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27.08.2018

Brain, intestines and kidneys, liver and lungs - what to do if vital organs stop working or failing? For a few years researchers have been able to breed small human organs from stem cells. This miniature model called organoid was developed by one of the pioneers of stem cell researchers Jürgen Knoblich. Patients on the waiting list for a donor organ, hope for replacement by organoids. If it were possible to breed transplantable organs from them, all the problems of transplantation medicine would be eliminated: their production would be ethically unproblematic, they could be produced as needed, and they would not be rejected. Meanwhile, almost all human organs are grown as organoids in the labs. However, the breeders of organs are still pretty much at the beginning. So far, it is often simple tissues that are bred. Can these be equipped with blood vessels or nerve fibers in the future and are there general risks in dealing with the artificial organs? Above all: In which time frame will the research findings be helpful for the patients?

Panel

  • Dr. Thomas Breidenbach, managing director of the Bavarian Region at the German Foundation for Organ Transplantation
  • Dr. Jürgen Knoblich, senior scientist and deputy director of the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna
  • Dr. Julia Ladewig, Developmental brain pathologies at the University of Heidelberg and group leader at the Institute for Reconstructive Neurobiology at the University of Bonn

Date: 17 September 2018, 7 pm
Location: Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Markgrafenstraße 38, 10117 Berlin
Registration: Online


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